yangon young nuns street scene

A Photography Tour to Myanmar – A days preparation in Yangon.

The plane has just landed in Yangon. In two days time 6 people are going to join me on a photography tour to Myanmar. It is exciting. I love the country and have planned the trip with a trusted local agent. We’ve been working on it for almost a year but I’m still a little nervous. The driver who picks me up speaks English and tells me how busy he is with so many visitors.   It is time to visit Myanmar as things are changing.

I check in to the chosen hotel where I will be staying for 4 nights. It isn’t the original one I had wanted to stay in but it’s fine. I breathe a sigh of relief as I am shown up to a ‘quiet’ room on the 4th floor. Tomorrow I am going to visit a couple of other hotels for the next Myanmar trip. It is mid afternoon and I waste no time in going to see the agent I use to organise my Myanmar Photography Tours.

Train passengers in Yangon station

Trains stops in Yangon station

Win greets me with a wide smile, sees my anxious face and tells me everything will be fine!  He has even added small things to make our trip even better. Informs me of an upgraded hotel in Bagan and a new guide in Mandalay. ‘You will get even better photographs than the last time’ he assures me. On the way back to the hotel I can’t stop taking pictures, they’re snaps really of people drinking tea on the sidewalks, the hustle and bustle of downtown Yangon, such a photogenic city.

The next day I visit a couple of hotels, one is 5 star and I wonder if I could go more upmarket on the next trip and choose it, a haven of peace between the Shwedagon Pagoda and downtown. Win will have to negotiate the price!

The traffic back to my hotel is pretty dense. On arrival I receive a message. Two of my photography tour students have just arrived, a day ahead of time. I call their room and they come down. A charming Australian couple who are so excited and pleased to see me. It is their first trip to the area and they just flew in from Thailand.

Rangoon Tea House

Rangoon Tea House

It’s lunchtime and I take them to the Rangoon Tea House, which is an attractive restaurant on the 2nd floor of an ordinary looking building, albeit for westerners. They love the place and take out their cameras immediately! The Rangoon Tea House is a good place to try local dishes as spice wise, they do at least cater to the western palate. The place is pretty full and noisy but it’s after 2.00 so there was no wait. We discuss Myanmar, the trip, photography and cameras.

Young monks begging for alms

Yangon Young monks begging for alms

We take a walk where I know there is a monastery in the hope that we will see some young monks then go back to the hotel before we set off to see the sunset. I have two good sunset shots set up for the following two nights at the Irawaddy river and the Shwedagon Pagoda, so tonight we’ll go to Kandawgyi Lake. Just as we are about to leave a hot tired looking woman checks in and gives her name to the reception. She’s one of us! I recognise the name, say hi and never get to Kandawgyi Lake! I send the Australian couple off with a map and wish them good luck.

The next day the three remaining other people arrive and the photography tour officially begins. 12 days of extraordinary photography, laughter and companionship in this stunning, memorable land that I never tire of.

sunset over Irrewaddy river Yangon

sunset over Irrewaddy river Yangon

https://www.annasphototraveltours.com/myanmar/

Industrial, Corporate and Landscape photography in Turkana Country, Kenya

Turkana tribes people with animals Kenya

Turkana tribes people Kenya

It’s 5.30 am in Nairobi and time to go. It’s still dark outside, but in a short while the car will come and pick me up and take me to Wilson Airport for the first flight out to Kapese in the Turkana region of Northern Kenya. I’m excited. I am on a great assignment, a corporate and industrial shoot for an oil company that is also going to allow me to discover the region and get up close to the local communities. As well as photographing the oil rigs, I will be shooting portraits, landscapes and local people. Aerials are also needed so a flyover has to be arranged.

helicopter take off in Turkana

helicopter taking off from Kapese airport, Turkana

On arrival at Wilson airport there is a hub of activity. Dawn is beginning to break and I take out a camera and start taking pictures of all the rig workers checking in. The plane eventually takes off and as we fly over the Rift Valley I try to imagine what it must have been like all those millions of years ago when man took his first steps. On the approach to Kapese, looking out of the window, I see that the terrain is semi arid desert scrub.

Landscape of turkana huts and local women

Huts and women in Turkana Kenya

There are mountains in the distance and on closer inspection there are groups of circular huts dotted around. Many Turkana are nomadic herdsmen who move from place to place.

The days go by quickly. There is so much to photograph.

Oil rig in Turkana Kenya

Oil rig in Turkana, Kenya

The camps, the rigs, the workers, people from the local communities who work with and for the oil companies. There are the Corporate Social Responsibility programmes that help the local communities. It is boiling hot and the alight in the middle of the day ferocious. I’m shooting a local company preparing the terrain for a new rig, sweat pouring off their faces. The earth is red, they are in blue and it’s a terrific shot. We visit the schools and the numerous water wells that the company has set up to help the nomadic tribes living in these harsh conditions.

Whilst driving around on bumpy unmade roads, herdsmen with their goats and camels cross our path. Amidst the scrub are extraordinary formations of anthills. We come across groups of women carrying plastic water containers.   I’m constantly shouting ‘stop!’, as I see so many photo opportunities. The people are beautiful.

Turkana girl with oil rig behind

Turkana girl with oil rig behind

They shave their heads apart from the centre, which is often plaited, and wear wonderful colourful beads around their necks. As we stop the children rush out to meet us. Some of the adults are happy to be photographed and others not at all. I talk to them, show them my camera, the pictures I’ve taken and explain why I’m here and doing this. Most of the drivers are Turkana, and are happy to help with translating and eventual persuasion if needed!

Time is almost up, I’ve taken thousands of photos, downloaded them on various hard drives at least twice to make sure that the pictures are safe. I’ve made several friends and feel I would like to stay longer and get more pictures. Back home the work isn’t finished, a hefty job of post-production begins which plunges me back into those dazzling desert days, a world away from the bustling city I live in.